Costa Rica’s ambitious commitment to reducing carbon emissions places it at the forefront of the fight against climate change. But its politicians worry that, with financial aid being focused elsewhere, it could effectively be punished for its early adopter status.

Euromoney’s meeting is in Puriscal, the eponymous town of the fourth-largest canton in the province of San José, close to a large, crumbling cathedral that is being reclaimed by nature.

The building is still an imposing sight, but trees now take advantage by growing in (and widening) the cracks in the walls that were opened by a series of earthquakes in the 1990s. In 2009, a health notice ordered its demolition, but there has been no movement to either its destruction or rehabilitation in the following years.

From the nearby headquarters of Cooperpuriscal, a farming cooperative that was established by the ministry of environment and energy (Minae) and is financed by a mix of public funds and local private businesses, we head further up the mountain.  We are driving to a finca – a smallholding, which in this case has 26 cows. The finca’s residential building sits at the side of the road and does not hint at the modern construction to the back: brushed steel gates and fences contain healthy-looking cows that mill around on a perfectly-level concrete floor that drains down to a sluice.

The representative from Cooperpuriscal explains the overall structure that has recently been installed and (after another visit to a neighbouring finca) is clearly created to a template. All of the cows’ waste is captured in solid form in a structured production chain that produces organic, rich compost for use on the farm and for sale. The slurry gets washed into a polythene-covered tank that generates enough gas for the farmer to power the whole site.  The retained compost boosts the yield on the farm’s crops, which now supplement the cows’ grazing on pastures, which increases and stabilizes milk production. Meanwhile, the milking process uses modern equipment and feeds directly into a hygienic, on-site tank that is emptied every two days by the cooperative’s dairy lorry.
For the full article visit Euromoney.com

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